China Holiday Visa Explained

Published by Travel Visa Pro on Thu Sep 28 2017

When you’re planning the ultimate getaway to Asia, China might be very high on the list. The Terracotta Army, Tiananmen Square, the Great Wall… the country certainly has quite an impressive array of attractions to bring in the tourists. China, like many other countries in Asia, requires any visiting US citizens to apply in advance for a tourist visa – though for very short stays a transit visa may be allowed.

Going on holiday? Visas to China are available!

Let’s take a look at some of the China holiday visas. Any US citizen arriving in China through any international port – ferry terminal, airport, train station – must have a valid L visa. To obtain this holiday visa, it’s necessary to visit a Chinese embassy or consulate at least a week in advance (more is advisable) and bring the appropriate paperwork:

– A Chinese visa application form, with “tourism” checked under “purpose of visit”
– Your current US passport, valid for at least six months from your expected day of arrival in China and containing at least two blank pages for visas and stamps.
– A passport photo to include in the aforementioned application
– A $140 fee + $10 for expedited service or + $20 for rush service. Cash is not accepted.
– A copy of your travel itinerary, including dates of stay and confirmed hotel reservations.

Who qualifies for a working holiday visa for China?

Working holiday visas are agreements between two foreign governments to allow young people (usually 18-30 years old) to work for one year in the other’s country. Unlike regular work visas, which require a company sponsor and details regarding the place of employment, salary, accommodations, etc., WHVs are surprisingly flexible.

Unfortunately, US citizens do not qualify for a working holiday visa to China. Currently, the only country with an arrangement for a working holiday visa for China is New Zealand.

When’s the best time to visit China on a holiday visa?

With the exception of the times for the largest migration on earth around early October and mid-February, there’s no bad time to apply for a holiday visa to China. Spending the winter holidays in northern China may have travelers experiencing some truly cold conditions, but summers in the middle kingdom are even less appealing for some, with pollution accentuated by the heat and humidity.

Whatever time of year you choose, be sure to stop by your nearest Travel Visa Pro office for a holiday visa to China. Our staff will work to get a valid visa in your hand without the stress.

Would you want to visit China on holiday? Where would you go and why?